Tag Archives: crowd sourcing

It’s Official…21 New Words Were Added to the Dictionary Using Crowd-Sourcing!

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21_magnetThe first edition of the Collins dictionary published in 1979, with Patrick Hanks as editor and Lawrence Urdang as editorial director, was a milestone in dictionary making as it was the first to use the full power of computer databases and typesetting in the preparation of a dictionary. This meant that, for instance, subject editors could control separate definitions of the same word and the results could be blended into the result, rather than one editor being responsible for a word.

By the third edition, they increasingly used the Bank of English established by Hanks at COBUILD to provide typical definitions rather than examples composed by the lexicographer.

The unabridged Collins English dictionary was published on the web on December 31, 2011 at www.collinsdictionary.com along with the unabridged dictionaries of French, German, Spanish and Italian. The site also includes example sentences showing word usage from the Collins Bank of English Corpus, word frequencies and trends from the Google Ngrams project, and word images from Flickr.

Last year, in August, www.collinsdictionary.comintroduced Facebook-linked crowd-sourcing for neologisms. In other words they asked us (meaning anyone who speaks English) to submit new words for inclusion in the dictionary!

For those of you who are passionate about the preservation and evolution of the English language, that’s not as bad as it sounds. They still maintained overall editorial control in order to be distinguishable from Wiktionary and Urban Dictionary. So just because a word is submitted doesn’t mean it automatically makes it into the dictionary. Editors evaluate and research submissions just as they would any other word under consideration.

Alex Brown, head of digital at Collins, said in a press release, “It is essential that we keep our ear close to the ground listening out for new words emerging from pop culture, science, and technology.” He added; “Most dictionaries are static.” By allowing the public to participate the folks at Collins Dictionary feel that we stay on top of the evolving English language.”

Here are those twenty-one additions:
1. Legbomb – when a person, usually a celebrity, shows off a lot of leg.
2. Cray – commonly used by rappers such as Jay-Z and Kanye West to mean crazy.
3. Yolo – a word used by R&B artist Drake to mean “you only live once.”
4. Tebowing – to drop to a knee as if you’re praying in the nature of NFL quarterback Tim Tebow.
5. Omnishambles – something which is completely and continuously in shambles.
6. Creeping – pursuing women in a nightclub.
7. Mantyhose – tights for men.
8. Tweeps – Twitter users.
9. Twitlit – poems, sayings, and aphorisms that debuted on Twitter and adhere to its 140-character limit.
10. Twitterverse
11. Carmageddon – a state of extreme traffic congestion.
12. Trendfear – the anxiety that you are not up to date on certain trends.
13. Gazanging – when a property seller pulls the plug at the last minute, eaving the buyer hanging.
14. Photobombing – appearing at the back of someone else’s photograph without their realizing it, so they are surprised when they see the photo.
15. Lollage – use of the phrase “lol” meaning “laugh out loud.”
16. Amazeballs – amazing.

Not all of the words are so… nontraditional. For example, Collins editors have also approved words such as :
17. occupy
18. insourcing
19. livestream
20. crowdsource
21. flashmob

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